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But her spirits brighten when Monsieur Loisel suggests that she borrow jewels from her friend, Madame Jeanne Forestier. Wasting no time, Mathilde visits her friend the following day. Madame Forestier, only too willing to cooperate, opens a box and tells Mathilde to choose. Inside are glittering jewels. Mathilde selects a diamond necklace so beautiful that it quickens her heartbeat.

At the party, Mathilde is the center of attention. Handsome men of high station ask who she is and line up to dance with her. Not until 4 a. He wants to wait for a cab to arrive. Out in the cold, they search for transportation, wandering toward the Seine. In time, they find a cab, and it takes them to their home on Rue des Martyrs. In her bedroom, Mathilde stands before a mirror and removes her wrap to gaze upon the woman who has enchanted so many men. Then she notices to her horror that the necklace is missing. She and her husband search through their belongings but cannot find it.

After they conclude that the necklace must have come off on their way home, Monsieur Loisel goes out to search for the cab they rode in. He returns at 7 a. Visits to the police and the cab company, as well as other measures, also leave them empty-handed.

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This ploy will buy time. Next, they decide that their only recourse is to replace the necklace. Going from jeweler to jeweler, they search for a facsimile.

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They find one in a shop in the Palais Royal. The price: 36, francs. To raise the money, Loisel uses all of his savings and borrows the rest, writing promissory notes and signing his name on numerous documents. Then the Loisels buy the replacement, and Mathilde takes it in a case to Madame Forestier. The latter expresses annoyance that it was returned late, then takes the case without opening it to check its contents.

Thereafter, the Loisels scrimp and save to pay their debt. After they dismiss their housemaid, Mathilde does the work herself, washing dishes and linen, taking out the garbage, and performing other menial labors. She also wears common clothes and haggles at the market. Monsieur Loisel moonlights as a bookkeeper and copyist. Ten years later, they are out of debt. They have paid back every borrowed franc and sou. By this time, Mathilde is fully a commoner, with rough hands, plain clothes, and disheveled hair. And she looks older than her years.

Occasionally, she thinks back to the day when she wore the necklace and when so many men admired her. What would have happened if she had never lost the necklace?

The Necklace

When Mathilde addresses her, her friend does not recognize her — so haggard does Mathilde look. After Mathilde identifies herself, she decides to tell Madame Forestier everything. What could be the harm? After all, she has paid for the necklace, working ten long years at honest, humble labor to fulfill her obligation.

But mine was false. At most, it was worth five hundred francs! In "The Necklace," Maupassant makes every word count, each one contributing to the overall effectiveness of the story. He provides only minimal details to further the plot and describe the important characters. The result is a simple, easy-to-understand story that moves smoothly and swiftly from beginning to end.

Details that he leaves out allow the reader to interpret the events and the characters in his or her own way. One may compare "The Necklace" to a painting with subtle shades of meaning. Maupassant himself remains aloof from his characters, passing no judgments on them, neither praising nor condemning them. For example, it is up to the reader to decide whether Mathilde is a victim of bad luck or fate or of her own warped perception of the world as a place where success and recognition result from wealth and status.

Fate vs Free Will. Oh, Mathilde, you asked for it! I feel bad for your husband, though. I also liked "Miss Harriet", "The Horla". And the rest of them They are good, entertaining; yet nothing too extraordinary, honestly. However, this Guy deserves four stars I really liked those stories I mentioned before.

Superb collection. I have a tender place in my heart for cripples, bastards, and broken things. No, that doesn't ring true for Maupassant. In fact, I don't feel much tenderness at all from his writing. But what he does have in spades is a firm grasp on the reality of his time. He seems to be a man who tells it like it is, and fuck your feelings. You should have seen it coming.

Because we're all so damn predictable - would rather live years in torment than fess up. We'll give up all we have to be liked and respect I have a tender place in my heart for cripples, bastards, and broken things. We'll give up all we have to be liked and respected, if only for a moment.


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It's human nature, after all. An excellent selection of Maupassant's stories, of which "The Necklace" is the most familiar from numerous anthologies. Many are set in the author's native Normandy, some on the coastline by the Channel, others to the south by the Bay of Biscay.

A few have an urban setting, usually in Paris, and one is set in the Alps. The story-lines run the gamut, from comedy Theodole Sabot's Confession and The Wrong House An excellent selection of Maupassant's stories, of which "The Necklace" is the most familiar from numerous anthologies.

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Some are written as frame stories, for example a group of people gather together and tell tales on a particular theme; the narrator's story is the one we read, and it's a corker. One story, The Trip of Le Horla, about the author's experience in a balloon journey from Paris to the mouth of the Scheldt, is wonderfully descriptive with a suspenseful ending. Almost all the stories have an ironic twist, and many play on a theme of loss and regret: lost youth, lost beauty, lost love, and lost innocence. View all 5 comments. For good reason is this entitled 'The Necklace and Other Stories' because The Necklace is one of the few stories really worth reading.

Most people read The Necklace at some point in their education. Maupassant created a delightful fable with important lessons that can be gleaned from it. Ball-of-Fat follows a group who are fleeing their war-torn For good reason is this entitled 'The Necklace and Other Stories' because The Necklace is one of the few stories really worth reading.

Ball-of-Fat follows a group who are fleeing their war-torn area, but are detained en route to their destination and are all faced with a moral dilemma. Miss Harriet is a sweet and sorrowful story of a bond between a young French artist and an elderly English maid. The Horla is either a supernatural thriller about a man attacked by an invisible enemy. These three stories I would have enjoyed a more lengthy book-version. The other stories - A Piece of String, Mme. Worth reading only to say I read the entire set. An okay sampling of de Maupassant's works which I suspect were a bit more entertaining in his era than now.

Not a bad piece but few of the stories actually grabbed me and one or two of those were not the endings one is lead to believe he will find, which I suspect was his forte. The Necklace continues to be a priceless story. Short collection. Easy read.

The Necklace and Other Stories: Maupassant for Modern Times

You've probably read "The Necklace" at some point: in grade school, perhaps in a college literature class, or in a collection containing short stories from various authors. It's very good, and its mirror image, "The Jewels" which I hadn't read previously is also very good.

I appreciate that "Ball of Fat" Boule de Suif is translated here as "Butterball", a slightly nicer word for the prostitute who appears within the story. Two "horror" stories here entitled "The Hand" and "The Entity" feel l You've probably read "The Necklace" at some point: in grade school, perhaps in a college literature class, or in a collection containing short stories from various authors. Two "horror" stories here entitled "The Hand" and "The Entity" feel like Poe and were written at about the same time Poe was writing.

Of course, this feeling could have been the way the translator saw the story.